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Monday, February 17, 2014

Wednesday Questions

Post your question for Wayne and Caitlind before noon on Wednesday!

14 comments:

  1. In his Ted Talk, Olafor Eliasson remarks that “Experience” lies in the space “between thinking and doing.” Couple this sentiment with the video of people interacting with CLOUD (wherein, an unprompted collective conscious was born, seeking to experience it together) and this leads me to wonder:

    How can interactive art that invites multiple participants, help encourage this communally driven thinking/doing? Just how important is this process for a city such as Lexington, a community that is at a great moment of transformation and regrowth? (which will no doubt require great feats of collective thinking/doing).

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  2. I was particularly interested in the grand sense of interactivity within most of the artworks in these video links and how this is markedly different when it is found inside a museum/gallery space (as with the work of Ann Hamilton, Karina Smigla-Bobinski, and Thomas Saraceno) and within the unmediated environment of the city as with Olafor Eliasson's "Green River." Could you talk a bit about this, about how projects like Wreck City are viewed/experienced differently by people who seek them out as "experiences of art" and by people who happen upon them as something that simply exists within their city?

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  3. I found the following question from the TED talk influential, as well as intriguing to think about: “How do we create an idea, which is both, tolerant to individuality and also to collectivity without polarizing them into two different opposites?” How would you answer this question?

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  4. In the Wreck City mini- documentary one artist discusses how the wreck city format may reach audiences that are intimidated by the traditional gallery space. Was the conceptualization and formation of formal art galleries a direct response to the criticism of art as a serious stand alone discipline? What has changed in how artists look at this common criticism specifically? How can traditional art galleries reduce the anxiety of those who are intimidated with the space while still preserving the integrity of an artists work. While participatory works do this very well as can be seen through the other videos, what other things could help?

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  5. The project that captured my attention the most. The collaboration of all of the artists on the project was so cool. As artists on that project, what were some of the challenges of the project? What was your favorite part?

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  6. Collectivity—whether in the production of an artwork or in its enjoyment—clearly seems important to you (both your own work with CLOUD and your emphasis on community-based collaborative art seem to point in that direction). Can you talk about the significance of collectivity to each of you? How did you find your way to making art together?

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  7. Clearly having the community involved and engaged is a crucial part to your artwork. How do you go about determining the level involvement that you wish for the community to have in your art projects? Also, do you usually aim for creating a completely new project or piece, or revitalizing a structure of something already in place that would change how the community views and acts around said structure?

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  8. When you participate in a community art project, such Wreck City, do you get any negative feedback from the community? If so, how do you respond to it and try to show those people the positive effects of the art?

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  9. I love how all of these projects really evoked sensory input and how that brought out a person's true nature. How could use this idea of sensory stimulation to bring out the community's inner self in our own local projects?

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  10. In the TED talk, Eliasson mentions collectivity along with individuality. How do you all incorporate these ideas into your works of art/projects? Or is this even something you aim to have within your works?

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  11. What is the biggest challenge in creating huge works of art or installations (time, support from the community, financial resources, raw materials)? Does the work usually pay off or do you often have regrets and ideas to change parts of the work if you could go back?

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  12. I love how these artist create works that are interactive with the general public. Is there anyway to become a part of this kinds of "movement"? It seems like the art that has been done so quietly is now spillng out into the street and demanding to be heard and seen, its lovely. But what does that mean for the artist themselves? If one of their projects does not go well how does that effect them?

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  13. I was fascinated by what the artists did in wreck city. What can be done or arranged in order to start a project like this in other places? I believe there are some old abandoned homes behind Transy's campus on Bourbon street. I heard rumors that those houses might be demolished so what can be organized to possible bring an art gallery to lexington just like wreck city.

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  14. I loved that the idea that all of these works were made in order to get the community involved, which allows art to become more accessible to a lot of people. Is it ever a challenge to find ways to get more people involved in the artworks?

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