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Monday, January 28, 2013

Blog Assignment #2

Place your questions for this week's reading here!!

15 comments:

  1. Could it be that food insecurity is not only brought on by financial instability within a family or the size of a family, but also the families whose financial decisions are not always the best? We live in a time where materialistic things seem to outweigh some necessities and are presented as needs rather than luxuries. For example, they may have the money for food and other necessities, but rather, unwisely spend their income on wants and desires, later finding themselves in debt.

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  2. Although the information gathered for this discussion is based on a Current Population Survey of the United States, I am interested in its relevance to a much smaller population, like Lexington. Is it possible to assume that the results of this study reflect the food insecurities and growth of multigenerational families found in the resident population of Lexington? If so, are there specific areas within the city in which there are trends in food insecurity and multigenerational families?

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    1. I just would like to point out that we posted these at the exact same moment with very similar content. Woah.

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  3. This study takes so many factors into account that it was difficult for me to relate it to the Lexington community with my limited knowledge. Has there been a large food security change in Lexington since the beginning of the Great Recession? Has it decreased significantly? If so, have there been any public policy changes to combat the issue?

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  4. This article addresses multigenerational living and food insecurity. I am insecurities about the issue of food insecurity in broader terms. In comparison to the global average of food insecurity where does the US stand? According to the Wikipedia article I read ( I know not the best source) as of 2006 more people are overweight than malnourished. Does this mean our system of distribution is wrong? Are food politics involved here??

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    1. This is a great question, Kristina. (Of course, you would go to wikipedia :))

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  5. Clearly, language is important in a study like this one: a study of trends, grounded in empirical research and based on numbers, which is also aware of its importance for future policy making. Besides the use of the phrase “food insecurity”—instead of the more emotionally charged “hunger”—I noticed that the article refers to “a family in poverty” a number of times (for example, see p.3). I really appreciate this language as the phrase “family in poverty” suggests that the state of poverty does not define this family but is, rather, an experience—one of many—for this family. However, the article does use the term “poor family” a few times. In this case a family appears to be defined entirely by its economic status. Since you are one of the authors of the article, I would like to know how aware you were of your use of language, whether you chose to use the term “family in poverty” over “poor family.” I am also curious about the origins of the phrase “food insecurity.” When did it become the standard way to refer to people experiencing varying degree of hunger?

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  6. This article is troubling for many reasons. That we are not only talking about food insecurity in the United States—presumably, the most powerful country in the world and, as many would have us believe, the best place to live—but also measuring it in numbers that are not fractions of percentages but significant fractions of the whole—witness the statistic that by 2010, food insecurity affected 23 % of multigenerational families (3)—is already cause enough to rethink the rhetoric of the American Dream and to be concerned. However, what I find even more troubling is one of the basic findings of the authors: the presence of a grandchild in a family signals that this family is at a higher risk of entering food insecurity and remaining in this state. Essentially, this means that a lot of children in this country live at the risk of going hungry or are already suffering hunger. This fact makes any rhetoric of greatness void. It flies in the face of our basic beliefs as a nation—that we all have inalienable rights, for instance; it makes policies to change this sorry state of affairs absolutely and immediately necessary. My question, then: what are the policies that the authors bring up a few times in this study, policies of intervention and amelioration?

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  7. While this article does a lot of things such as providing detailed data and explanations of that data, it does not go into depth of what the term “Food insecurity” actually entails and why risk for multi-generational families are on the rise. Today, it is not an uncommon situation for a single (young adult or teenage) parent to move in with their parents because of a lack of resources to support themselves and their children. I am wondering if the rising risk of multi-generational household is partially due to the grandparent’s retiring while their children are relying on financial assistance from them as they try to raise their grandchildren? For instance, when working adults live together, they split the costs (ex, 4 incomes, 4 mouths to feed), but when (young) children are added to the count, the individuals making an income in the household become less than the mouths to feed (ex, 4 incomes, 6 mouths to feed).

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  8. Growing up in Appalachia, multigenerational families were not only an a common occurrence, but a way of life. Many families I know have not only grandparents and grandchildren present in the household, but aunts, uncles, and cousins as well. While the scarcity of food cannot be denied in some situations, the fact remains that for at least one geographical region, this is a staple of the culture. How are we to address situations such as these, where factors such as a cultural tradition may be hindering a family?

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  9. Considering the long lasting effects that multigenerational families have on food insecurity, what would be the most effective way in which to start to reverse the effects on all generations as a whole? Is there something that could be done in general, or is the best way to just cease having as many multigenerational families present?

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  10. I always considered multi-generational families a complete anomaly while growing up, and marveled at the kids around me that were 'lucky enough' to live with their extended family. While I realize this facet of culture is much more dynamic than my elementary viewpoint, I'd love to explore the connections between the NoLi neighborhood, multigenerational families, and food scarcity. What intersections play into this occurrence? How does the new socioeconomic class emerging in NoLi factor into the overall representation of 'food scarcity' as well as multigenerational families? Will hunger in this neighborhood be ignored because of the new population or embraced and worked upon as a community?

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